When Can I Modify Child Support in Florida?

When Can I Modify Child Support in Florida?

Although your divorce decree comes with a sense of finality for the relationship you had with that person, there are still issues that emerge related to orders handed down in the divorce. For this reason, you might find yourself working with your lawyer again for modifications to existing orders. In Florida, you cannot receive a modification in your case unless you can show that circumstances have changed significantly. When you come forward with a modification, you should do so under your lawyer’s guidance so that you can avoid common mistakes and increase your overall chances of success.

After a child support order is made active in the state of Florida, the circumstances may change in the life a child or in the life of a parent to the extent that the parent making the payments may request a modification of child support. Child support can always be modified under Florida law as long as the change would be 15% of at least $50, whichever of these is higher. A substantial change in circumstances must apply in order for a child support order to be modified. A substantial change can be caused by a change of income for either parent, a change in the overnight parenting pattern exercise or the overnight parenting pattern exercise by either parent.

The most common reason that one parent comes forward to initiate a child support modification is due to a change in income. The change can be downward or upward and may involve the parent receiving support or the parent paying support. There is no absolute amount that a parent’s income needs to change before requesting modification. A child support calculator is a good way to tell whether or not you may be eligible to have child support reduced and consulting with an experienced family lawyer is strongly recommended to ensure that you have someone advocating for your best interests and telling you what to expect during this time.
The right lawyer makes a big difference- talking things over with your attorney can help you pinpoint your primary reasons for initiating a chance and ensures that your case is presented as effectively as possible.

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